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Windows styles

There are two main types of windows: those that open and those that don't. Those that open are called Operable and those that don't are called Fixed.  The illustration on these pages shows the common varieties and will give you basic information about how they perform.

Fixed Windows

Fixed windows are stationary units mounted within a frame. They are great for letting in light and exposing views,but provideno  ventilation.Among the more visually interesting choices are octagonal, half circle, ellipse windows and a corner window that has a single pane if bent at a 90 degree angle. These windows tend to be more energy efficient as they quite simply don't open andproperly installed offer fewer opportunities for drafts.

Casement

Casement windows are hinged at the sides. Hinged windows such as casements generally have lower air leakage rates than sliding windows from the same manufacturer because the sash closes by pressingagainst the frame.Casement windows project outward,providing significantly better ventilation than sliders of equal size. Because the sash protrudes from the plane of the wall, it canbe controlled to catch passing breezes, but screens must be placed on the interior side. Virtually the entire casement window area can be opened, while sliders are limited to less than half of the window area.

Top hung \ Awning
Awning windows are hinged at the top and open outward. Hinged windows such as awnings generally have lower air leakage rates than sliding windows from the same manufacturer because the sash closes by pressing against the frame. Screens are placed on the interior of the window unit. Similar to casements, the entire window area can be opened, while sliders are limited to less than half of the window area.

Hopper
Hopper windows are hinged at the bottom and open inward. Hinged windows such as hoppers generally have lower air leakage rates than sliding windows from the same manufacturer because the sash closes by pressing against the frame. Screens are placed on the exterior of the window unit. Similar to casements, the entire window area can be opened, while sliders are limited to less than half of the window area.
Slider
Both sashes slide horizontally in a double-sliding window. Only one sash slides in a single-sliding window. A Vertical Slider or Single Hung window, as it is also known, is identical to a Horizontal Slider but the bottom slides up. Ventilation area can vary from a small crack to an opening of one-half the total glass area. Screens can be placed on the exterior or interior of the window unit. Horizontally sliding windows generally have higher air leakage rates than projecting or hinged windows.